Here’s why your mobile marketing strategy isn’t working – part two

This is part two of the article series discussing how mobile can be integrated into your marketing strategy. If you haven’t read part one, yet take a look now.

Mobile for events

Exhibitions, conferences and trade shows are still some of the best ways to meet and talk to potential buyers for your products, but they’re not cheap. Once you’ve got your space booked you’ll need to buy a stand, get some collateral designed and printed, organise couriers for your things, collect details from interested parties, follow them up after the event has finished… you get the idea, but start including mobile and you can actually lighten the load.

If you create your key collateral, like product information booklets or leaflets as digital documents then you can distribute them to prospects via mobile without ever needed to print, collate or bind them. This has the benefit of ensuring they don’t get lost in the swamp of competing literature that your prospects are likely to collect that day, they don’t get damaged and they don’t get forgotten about – they’re kept on the phone ready to be looked at whenever the prospect wants.

An added bonus of this approach is that you can use the content distribution as an opportunity to gather accurate contact details for follow-up communications. Ask your prospects to text in to a short code to receive their promotional literature and you can send the documents over as an attachment in an instant, automatic response – and you’ve captured their mobile number. You could gather any further details you need by sending a follow-up text with a data capture form, erasing the chance of lost paper forms or transcribing illegible handwriting.

Mobile for your communications

This is where mobile really comes into its own – mobile phones are after all communication devices, although it can be easy to forget that when they can do so much else now. There are a number of approaches you can take when planning out mobile communications, each of which has its own benefits and drawbacks.

Any email campaigns you send should be optimised for opening on a mobile client, as estimates suggest 66% of emails are now read first on a mobile device. Ideal for inspiring action on your mobile-optimised website, emails do have the drawbacks of low open rates, spam filters and delayed response times, but can be a key part of many marketing campaigns.

Social media sites are often mobile-first for users, with many opting to use well designed mobile apps rather than navigating to the website directly. This gives you another great opportunity for triggering mobile specific actions, such as app downloads, visits to mobile websites, sending a text message or even a phone call (remember what a phone used to be for?). You do run the risk of your message being lost in the stream of other posts, but for targeting brand loyal customers social media is a strong option.

One of the greatest opportunities with mobile is one that isn’t actually available on any other platform – SMS. Of course, as the Managing Director of a mobile messaging company I’m going to say this, but the statistics and results really do speak for themselves. Sending text messages to your database is a great way of triggering instant action when you’ve got time sensitive offers or promotions, because on average a text message is opened within 90 seconds of receipt. Rather like with a tweet, the low character count means messages need to be concise, but that doesn’t mean you can’t add additional information with a link or a document attachment.

The mobile revolution has opened up a new world of opportunities for businesses, but all too often we’re being limited by looking at it as a single channel with a single route to the consumer. For a truly competitive edge in this new marketplace, we should be exploring all the ways that mobile can add value to our business and fully integrating it into our marketing strategy. Only then can we claim to be really embracing mobile marketing.